Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
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Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
Zoom Info
Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
Zoom Info
Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
Zoom Info
Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
Zoom Info
Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
Zoom Info
Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
Zoom Info
Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
Zoom Info
Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
Zoom Info
Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
Zoom Info

Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.

Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.

Bill Gates 2013 Annual Letter

Bill Gates is certainly one of the persons I admire the most. After all, he’s some sort of superhero with a lot of brain and money. In this interview with Stephen Colbert, he discusses his annual letter in regards to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The conversations touches down on topics like polio eradication, information technology and the decline in childhood deaths worldwide.

Also, for the fanboys, he talks a little bit about Steve Jobs.

Anyway. You know? Something that has always bothered me is the fact that everyone remembers Steve Jobs for his innovative product ideas and how he turned Apple into something cool. And then, here’s Uncle Bill doing all sorts of amazing stuff, and apparently he has nowhere near that coolness factor. Well, all that this tells me is that, sadly, saving the world is not that cool.

Oh, but does it matter? Honestly, Uncle Bill doesn’t seem to care. So, you know what I think would certainly be really-really cool? If we all aspired to be a little bit more him.

(Oh, also, go read Bill’s Annual Letter if you haven’t yet: http://annualletter.gatesfoundation.org/)

Here’s a short video depicting a chain reaction of human kindness, where small individual acts ripple endlessly to amount for big changes. I really liked it; I thought you might like it too.

The video is actually a compilation of several video clips filmed through the years, stuck together in perfect order to create a heartwarming sequence that is capable of lubricating your eyes with tears. The compilation was apparently inspired by the beautiful song that plays through it: Give a Little Love by Noah and the Whale.

Well, if you are; What you love,
And you do; What you love,
I will always be the sun and moon to you,
And if you share; With your heart,
Yeah, you give; With your heart,
What you share with the world is what it keeps of you.

Human kindness is complex. Even though, it is often defined as an attribute associated with single individuals, in reality it works more like a system. Actually, what would we discover if we mathematized human kindness? Is it possible for us to model it as a dynamical system relatively sensitive to initial conditions, and then go ahead and apply chaos theory to it?

Unexpected, spontaneous, powerful, stochastic, entropic, individualistic, systematic; human kindness is quite complex.