Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
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Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
Zoom Info
Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
Zoom Info
Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
Zoom Info
Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
Zoom Info
Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
Zoom Info
Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
Zoom Info
Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
Zoom Info
Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
Zoom Info
Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.
Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.
Zoom Info

Shintaro Ohata (born in Hiroshima, 1975) is a very talented artist. I admire him because he truly appreciates the little things in everyday life. As a result, his artwork is an authentic depiction of the unfathomable magic that perpetually exists around us: on a table at a fast-food restaurant, in the middle of a big city crossroad during a rainy day, spinning around a carousel at night, and waiting at an old metro station. There’s drama and romance hidden within the ordinary.

Ohata is well known for his characteristic style: placing sculptures in front of paintings and presenting them as one single work, thus revealing an intersecting point between the 2-D and the 3-D worlds.

Doce surpresa (“Sweet surprise” in portuguese) is a one-minute short produced by SQMA Film Delivery for Nokia. Interestingly enough, even though the purpose of the video is to serve as a marketing tool for the Nokia Lumia series, not a single phone is shown at all. This short takes the ”Amazing Everyday” theme and follows a style similar to that of “The Little Amazing Show” ads I’ve shown you before. As such, the video highlights the bonds between people and how the simplest of things can make your day.

I particularly like the song that plays on this video. Unfortunately, it was specifically composed for it, so we don’t get anything else than those sixty seconds. By the way, I’d deeply appreciate it if anyone could help me figuring out the lyrics. I tried to do it myself, but my French is a little bit rusty, so I’m not even sure if what I think I have is actually correct.

Même si on ne comprends pas
la vie * à la fois.
Même si la porte est fermée,
moi, je suis a tes côtés.

Et si tu voudras cacher
la tristesse qui t’a trouvé,
j’inventerai n’importe quoi
pour te voir sourire d’autres fois.

Nos coeurs séparés *

The Little Amazing Show, Episode 6: India.

This is the last episode and it’s about personality and how you can make your everyday more amazing by putting a little bit of yourself into it. It’s about doing things your own way and spicing everything up the way you like it. In some sense, it means forgetting about other people’s rules and doing only what you want to do and how you want to do it. All in all: you’ll make your own day more amazing, because you’re an amazing person.

TODAY, live it your way.

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Episode 1: Berlin. [link]
Episode 2: London. [link]
Episode 3: Madrid. [link]
Episode 4: Night. [link]
Episode 5: Paris. [link]

The Little Amazing Show, Episode 5: Paris.

I’ve been absent a little bit lately; thing is: I’ve been working intensely in a personal project which is almost completed by now but still is requiring a lot of a attention. Is this what parents feel when their kid is getting ready to leave for college?

Anyway, I’ll still bring you this week’s episode: number five, which is about happiness. And well, that’s not precisely a way to make your everyday more amazing, but a metric to know how amazing your everyday actually is. The morale of the story is, if you do things based on how happy they make you, your day will be much better. (duh!)

But remember: happiness is shareable, so never keep it to yourself. For instance, I hope I made you slightly happier today by sharing this awesome video with you.

TODAY, don’t worry, be Huggies. (8) I mean, happy.

Oh, and on a side note, it feels kind of nice to understand what these guys are saying even without reading the subtitles. I hope to find more motivation to polish my French, though.

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Episode 1: Berlin. [link]
Episode 2: London. [link]
Episode 3: Madrid. [link]
Episode 4: Night. [link]